Facing the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Mountains During the Winter

Ski resorts have opened in Colorado, and with more holidays around the corner, it is essential to remember that we are still currently amid a pandemic that is surging with cases here in Colorado. So what does that mean for those that live in the mountains and at altitude?

When it comes to the coronavirus, there are advantages and disadvantages to living at altitude. While research does show that COVID-19 has a more challenging time affecting mountainous populations, Summit County, Colorado has its own set of dangers. With the influx of skiers, travelers, and increased indoor activities, it is essential to remember how to protect yourself and your neighbors here in Summit. 

Research shows that populations living at higher altitudes are at less risk of transmission and have better adaptations to hypoxia than those living at lower altitudes (Pun et al., 2020). Interestingly, people living in high altitude environments live in a state of hypoxia or lower oxygen levels, and the lungs of these people generally adapt to conditions of decreased oxygenation. However, this has not been proven to be a saving grace, especially if the person has comorbidities like asthma, hypertension, diabetes, kidney disease, or COPD. Research has also shown that the environment is often colder and drier at higher altitudes with increased UV radiation, which can help slow the spread of the virus. However, this is only relevant when you are outside and does not diminish its spread indoors. While all these facts are unique to living at altitude, we must remember that Summit County is a tourist destination, is densely populated and requires the utmost protection despite these factors. 

So how do you protect yourself this upcoming winter in the mountains? With ski resorts initiating strict policies and physical distancing, what are ways that we can help keep these businesses and resorts open?

Some might blame the tourist for bringing COVID to the mountains; however, the increase in numbers can be tracked down to Summit County residents spreading it to one another through social events and large gatherings. It is important to remember to wear a mask, stay at home whenever possible, wash your hands if you feel sick, get tested, isolate, and make sure to get your flu shot.  It is essential to listen to public health orders as they change throughout this second surge of COVID-19 infections. Going into the holidays, the CDC recommends not traveling to see your family and only celebrating the holidays with family members that live in your house. It is essential to stay vigilant as we go into the winter months so the mountain communities can stay safe. 

COVID-19 Information 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Body Aches
  • Chills
  • Shortness of Breath
  • Headache
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • Congestion
  • Sore Throat
  • Nausea/Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

When do I seek emergency help?

  • Trouble breathing
  • Pain or pressure in chest
  • Inability to stay awake or awaken
  • Blue colored lips or face
  • New confusion

Where do I get tested in Summit County?

  • Community Testing Site
    • Where: 110 Third Ave. Frisco, Colorado
    • When: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday
    • Who: Asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals
    • How: email summitcovidtesting@vailhealth.org with the information below –
      • Name
      • Phone Number
      • Picture of Photo ID (not necessary if you don’t have one)
      • Front/Back pictures of insurance card (not necessary if you don’t have one)
  • Centura Health Community Testing Site
    • Where: Summit Vista Professional Building 18 School Rd. Frisco, Colorado
    • When: 9 a.m.- 2 p.m. Monday-Friday & 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. Saturday-Sunday
    • Who: Asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals
    • How: Call 970-668-5584 to receive testing referral. 
  • Summit Community Care Clinic
    • Where 360 Peak One Dr., Frisco, Colorado, First Floor, Summit County Medical Office Building, Suite #100.
    • When: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday during business hours
    • Who: SCCC patients or establish care with SCCC
    • How: Call 970-668-4040 to schedule an appointment
  • Mako Medical Community Testing Site
    • Where: Silverthorne Recreation Center overflow parking lot, 464-478 E Fourth St., Silverthorne, CO 804898.
    • Who: Asymptomatic and symptomatic
    • How: No appointment necessary, will need to complete registration at site or before online. 

Summit County updated testing information: https://summitcountyco.gov/1324/Testing

Caitlin Endly is a Texas transplant that has lived in Denver, Colorado for the past three years going to school to become a Family Nurse Practitioner at the University of Colorado. She has been a Registered Nurse for five years and currently works as a Neuro Trauma nurse at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Denver. She graduated with her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing from Texas State in San Marcos, Texas and has worked as a neuroscience nurse since graduating. In her free time she likes to dance, snowboard, and listen to live music. 

One thought on “Facing the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Mountains During the Winter”

  1. Proud of you Caitlin! Thank you for sharing this important information with your community. Can I say I knew you when? And guess what? I’m in FNP school too. I graduate in 2023!

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