Dr. Chris’s Tips for Staying Active Through the High Country Winter

Welcome to another Winter in the High Country! We’ve already had a series of snow storms in record-breaking cold temperatures across Colorado. On one hand, snow conditions are excellent! On the other hand, it’s sometimes cold enough to make you want to stay inside! One of the most effective ways to warm up is from the inside, out. Don’t forget about all the little opportunities you have to move your body and get your blood flowing, before, after, and even in the middle of a work day. Dr. Chris always has some valuable insight that she shared in a recent chat:

What keeps most of your patients from being more active during the Winter as opposed to the Summer?

Except for sledding and ice skating, Winter sports around here are very expensive. Not only is the equipment expensive, but having enough free time to actually go out and do something that takes more than one hour is very difficult for many of our families who are working two or three jobs, since Winter is the busiest season. Also, many of the parents did not grow up in a climate with snow, and came to Summit County for jobs, but not necessarily for recreation.

Is an hour your recommended duration for exercise?

Many studies have shown that 30 minutes a day of movement, whether it’s walking, running or dancing, can lead to adequate fitness. Personally, my goal is 14 hours a week. There are so many things that I want to do, and I want to do them fairly well and fairly intensely, so an hour a day isn’t enough for me to feel like I’m pursuing a maximum fitness level.

Aside from the obvious downhill skiing and snowboarding, what are some healthy activities you recommend during the Winter?

Shoveling snow, snow shoeing, hiking trails that are packed down, on Yaktrax “ice cleats” (inexpensive and very healthy, very good workout), hut trips (gives you a destination, which adds variety and camaraderie to your exercise; carrying a pack adds to your aerobic workout; on your way up, you’re getting the extra workout, but on your way home, it’s almost always downhill (and your pack is lighter), sledding, building snowmen or snow forts …

Do any of these activities provide benefits especially advantageous at altitude?

By doing any activity at altitude, you are increasing your cardiopulmonary fitness (heart & lungs). 

If you’re just getting started, aim for 20 minutes a day, and add five minutes every week. Listening to podcasts, books or music makes everything less painful and more fun. Get a buddy to engage in these simple activities with you. Wear layers for the weather. Being outside doesn’t have to be uncomfortably cold, and you’ll be more inclined to exercise longer if you’re not freezing.

Pay a little more attention to how you can anticipate your hunger throughout the day. I try to keep some nuts, cheese, grapes, small chocolates at my desk, in my pocket, in my car for quick snacks. A smoothie or coffee in a portable cup really cuts the hunger over a good amount of time.

Take advantage of down time to do a few stretches wherever you are. This opens up circulation, allowing your body better access to the nutrients and oxygen your blood delivers.

Be on the lookout for The Doc, cross country skiing on snow day streets, sledding at Rainbow Park, or getting a good stretch in just about anywhere. And let us know if you have a favorite activity that’s easy to fit into a busy or cold, indoor day that you’d recommend!

robert-ebert-santos

Roberto Santos is from the remote island of Saipan, in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. He has since lived in Japan and the Hawaiian Islands, and has made Colorado his current home, where he is a web developer, musician, avid outdoorsman and prolific reader. When he is not developing applications and graphics, you can find him performing with the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra, snowboarding Vail or Keystone, soaking in hot springs, or reading non-fiction at a brewery.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *